The Best Colleen Rothschild Hair Products (And A Secret Discount Code!)

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Last year, right before we went into lockdown, I started using Colleen Rothschild skin care and hair care products. I absolutely loved them (and still do) but for most of the past year talking about beauty products for readers to buy has felt a bit tone deaf. But now we seem to be getting to the other side of the pandemic, the world is opening back up to travel and I just received an order of travel sized products from Colleen Rothschild. And I got a Colleen Rothschild discount code for you! (Jump to the bottom of this post)

Healthy shiny hair for summer

But first lets talk about the products themselves.

Colleen Rothschild Quench and Shine Restorative Mask

For the past year I have been using the Colleen Rothschild Quench and Shine Restorative Hair Mask every time I wash my hair. This is a high performance yet lightweight conditioning treatment that doesn’t weigh the hair down. Instead it keeps your hair nourished and shiny and bouncy. It’s quite concentrated (like all her products) so a little goes a long way. I wrote a blog post about it here.

I would go as far as saying this is a hero product – that killer product that makes all the difference in the world, in this case to your hair. An added bonus is it smells really fabulous! I am addicted to the smell of really good haircare products. On photoshoots and commercials when I’m working my day job (makeup artist) I always get downwind of the hair stylist when they start spraying hairspray, if it’s a nice smelling one. Colleeen Rothschild doesn’t have a hairspray yet but I’m hoping they will before long, just because I love the smell of their hair products so much!

I have also been faithfully using the Colleen Rothschild Smooth and Shine Hair Serum for more than a year. This is a really concentrated serum that I run a pump or two through my hair prior to blow drying. The product is just gorgeous, and it makes thick, unruly, difficult hair like mine really manageable, soft and shiny. I swear by it.

When I wrote about the products last year I hadn’t yet tried the shampoo. In the interim time I have started using it too, and like all CR products, I love it.

I also wrote about wanting the Colleen Rothschild travel sized hair products for when I start traveling again post pandemic. At the time there was no sign of travel on the horizon so I didn’t order the travel set, but now I am booked to head back overseas next month (fingers crossed), so I got my hands on one for the trip. Since last year a new product has been added to the travel set, and it’s a product I haven’t yet tried, the Protect and Perfect Styling Cream.

Being that over the past year I have tried almost all of the Colleen Rothschild products I know it is going to be of that same super high standard. As a consumer I am fiercely loyal to the brands I use, right across the board. If something is working really well for me I like to stick with it, whether it’s a shoe brand, laundry detergent, jeans, coffee or in this case skin care and hair care. As a makeup artist over the past 30 years I have learned it is really bad for your skin to keep changing brands, be it with skin care or makeup products. So I find something that works, and I stick with it. And this is how I became so devoted to a brand I hadn’t even heard of 18 months ago.

I reached out to the company and asked if I could have a discount code for my blog readers and for my newsletter members. (Do you belong to the newsletter? It’s fabulous. You can join it here) They gave me the code CORINNA20 which gets you 20% off any and all products that are not part of a sale, or promotion priced. This month, May 2021, Colleen Rothschild Beauty has a Friends and Family 25% discount happening, which of course is a better deal than my CORINNA20 code, so of course you should use that one. But as you reorder products and try new things, if there is no other Colleen Rothschild discount code available at a better rate, use the CORINNA20 and save yourself some money!

Best Travel Masks: How To Look Chic and Feel safe In Europe This Summer

Now that the EU is set to open for international travel this summer we need to make plans for how we will both stay safe and not become super spreaders of the coronavirus while traveling.

Summer on Mykonos

On April 25th 2021 the EU announced their recommendation for member states to open for international travel this summer. The plan is still being worked on and fine tuned but some countries including Greece are opening as early as mid May.

What You Need To Know About Travel To Europe

The headlines on the EU announcement said that fully vaccinated travelers from approved countries would be allowed entry, however, there are a few items buried in the fine print that you need to know about.

  1. Each member state (country) will reserve the right to close its borders to anyone coming from a country where the virus rate is considered too high, and each country gets to decide for themselves what constitutes too high. This is worth paying attention to, especially if you are planning a multi country European trip. For example you may be planning to go to Paris then head to Barcelona, but if France’s covid infection rate goes higher than Spain’s threshold you could find yourself stuck at the border or the airport.
  2. Each member state will have its own rules for entry. Some may be fine with you just waltzing on in, some will require a rapid test, others will require a 72 hour PCR test prior to entry. It will be your responsibility to find out the requirements for each country on your list, and to source where you can get the required testing. This is unlikely to be free, so you should budget for each test. I read today that in Italy you can expect to pay $25 for a rapid and $75 for a PCR test.
  3. You may be wise to just stick to one country.
  4. If you are traveling from the U.S. at this time (May 2021) you will be refused boarding on your return flight unless you have proof of a negative test in the 72 hours prior to flying home. You will need to source out where you can get an approved test, make an appointment if required, and find out which forms of payment will be accepted, prior to travel.
  5. Each country may have dofferent rules regarding masks and social distancing, and it may change from on day to the next as case numbers rise and fall.

RELATED POST: Digital Health Passports and Why You’ll Need One Now To Travel

Read The Fine Print

One alarming feature of the EU travel plan is that it allows travelers who can prove recent recovery from covid and travelers who just have a negative covid test in the 72 hours prior to travel. To my way of thinking, this is a giant problem just waiting to happen.

It means you can be amongst travelers from places with excessively contagious variants, who have left home unvaccinated, and who can expose you to variants and mutations not swirling around your country/state/city yet. “Negative test travel” is what moved the U.K variant, The Brazilian, South African and now Indian variants around the world. In all likelihood travelers being allowed entry to any country based only on a negative test is only going to spread new and yet unknown variants around the world. I think it is madness. But of course, I’m not an epidemiologist or an infectious disease specialist, so hopefully I am wildly wrong.

The Best Masks For International Travel

It looks as though masks will be a requirement both throughout your flight and in many indoor and outdoor settings while you are traveling.

image via NBC.com

Some airlines are not accepting non-medical masks. This means you cannot wear a cloth mask, a facial shield, masks with valves, or handkerchief/scarf masks. Your only options are medical grade / surgical, disposable masks.

If you have worn the typical 3 fold paper masks you probably already know they aren’t always that comfortable when they’re on for multiple hours. The best medical grade masks in terms of comfort are the N95 and KN95 masks. What makes these so good is they seal nicely around the face without having gaping pockets at the sides, so are safer when dealing with an airbourne virus. Personally I like that they have a nose seal,so they don’t fog up your glasses, and most importantly (to me) is they have a large pouch in front of your mouth and nose, so you don’t feel like you’re suffocating. There’s no fabric or paper sucking up against your mouth or nose while you’re seaking or just trying to breathe.

KN95 masks.

I use KN95 masks when I’m on shoots. (I’m a makeup artist). I can have them on for 10 hours in the Phoenix heat and not feel like I’m about to get smothered. Plus, being a natural chatterbox I can talk to the talent and crew all day long and not be hampered by fabric or papersticking against my mouth and nose.

RELATED POST: 21 Books To Inspire Your Wanderlust

When Germany announced only people wearing surgical, N95 and KN95 masks would be allowed on any Lufthansa flight, other airlines followed it immediately and the masks all sold out overnight. I figured it could become a thing with international flights so I ordered a package of white KN95 masks and a pack of black KN95s. I’ve been saving them for travel when the world finally reopens. (They took about a month to arrive because everything was on back order.) They are readily available now, but as international travel picks back up this summer you can expect them to get back ordered again. I recommend getting a couple of packs now, while they are in stock.

I recently ordered a box of colored KN95 masks from Amazon to use on an upcoming trip to Italy. I have to be there for work (I’m soooo excited!) and wanted to have disposable masks with me, but didn’t want to be relegated to black and white masks. I got a box of 36 KN95s.

Each mask is individually plastic wrapped, keeping them hygenic and making them easy to pack, and to throw spares in my handbag and carryon bag. If travel does in fact open as it is supposed to, and if this work trip can happen, I will be in Italy for 14 days. The packaging on these masks makes them easy for me to plan out 14 days worth and not take up a ton of space in my suitcase. They come in a variety of color combos – I got particularly girlie colors, but they have plenty of guy options too.

RELATED POST: How To Plan Amazing Travel Using Pinterest

Mask Etiquette

When traveling internationally, both during you flight and while you are at your destination, you need to follow some mask etiquette.

  1. The first thing to know is no one is having fun wearing a mask. Whether you believe in covid or not, whether you like wearing a mask or not, we all are stuck having to wear one. It is what it is. If the rules say you have to wear a mask, don’t complain, just do it. Don’t be a Facebook Karen, don’t squawk about how you can’t breathe or some nonsense about breathing in CO2. If you seriously feel you cannot wear one, stay home.
  2. Change out your mask during the flight, but don’t drop your used mask on the floor. The cleaning crew shouldn’t have to handle your germy, used mask. You probably won’t feel overly comfortable if the stranger sitting next to you is dropping dirty masks on the floor and leaving them there.
  3. Pack a large ziplock bag into your hand luggage, mark it dirty masks with sharpie, and put your used masks inside, zipping it closed. When you arrive to your destination, drop the sealed ziplock bag with used masks into the trash.
  4. While at your destination only ever dispose of used masks in a trash can. If you think you will be changing your mask during the day pack a sandwich sized ziplock bag into your handbag/backpack/whatever you’re carrying, and eal your used mask inside. Even if you are convinced you don’t have the virus, always dispose of used masks respectfully. You wouldn’t like a bunch of foreigners dropping dirty masks in your front yard or in front of your place of work, so don’t do it to theirs.
  5. After changing your mask use hand sanitizer. Even if you don’t think you need it. Anyone watching you will feel more comfortable seeing you being hygenic. It’s a small thing to do, but the small things in life are the big things.

If you want more information about international travel during covid, mask rules while flying internationally, and updated details on travel in Europe this summer, join my newsletter. The Glam Italia newsletter only comes out twice each moth but is full of information for travelers and armchair travelers! You can get the scoop here

Venice By Numbers: Fabulous, Fascinating Facts To Add Magic To Your Trip

Happy Birthday Venice! Or maybe I should say tantissimi auguri! March 25th is the official birth date of Venice, although there is no documentation for when the city on the water actually started. This date was chosen because at noon on the 25th of March in 421 A.D the first church of Venice was dedicated. This was the Church of San Giacomo on what was then the tiny islet of Rialto.

How Venice Started

Do you know how Venice got started? After the fall of the Roman Empire the Barbarians (Huns and Longobards) invaded Italy, looting and pillaging and destroying everything in their path. Some of the Veneti (people from the Veneto) escaped by hiding out in the marshy lagoon that lay between the mouths of the Po and Piave rivers, and the Adriatic Sea. This swamp was full of raised mud mounds or mini islands (islets)

The island of Torcello was first settled in 452 and has the oldest of Venice’s treasures.

They couldn’t build their town on the silt and mud so they had to come up with a clever idea. The end result was an engineering marvel that not only built the floating city but has kept it going for 1600 years! Those original buildings are mostly gone but there are buildings in Venice still standing after 1000 years.

They devised a system where they took huge wooden poles – essentially tree trunks, up to 10 meters long, and drove them down through the silt and mud of the marshy islands until they hit the hard clay way down below. The put these poles or pilings side by side so they were touching, then filled any space between with rocks and stones. The pilings were of water resistant wood like oak and larch, and they didn’t rot because in order for rot to set in you need both water and oxygen. Not only was there no oxygen below the water level, but the lagoon was full of silt and mud that absorbed into the wood and then over time became petrified and hard as stone.

Two layers of wood went over the pilings, then a layer of stone or marble upon which the houses and then palaces were built. Brilliant, no?

Venice By The Numbers

Venice is full of secrets along with some pretty fascinating facts and figures. So let’s look at some of the numbers.

The Sestieri

Map of Venice via Wandering Italy

Venice is a really small city, broken up into 6 neighborhoods or sestieri. There are 3 neighborhoods on either side of the Grand Canal. The first three are: Cannaregio (by the train station)which is also the most populated one, San Marco, in the middle and where perhaps the most famous tourist sites are, and Castello, the largest of the six.

On the far side of the Grand Canal there is the Dorsoduro at the top, roughly opposite San Marco. This is where the huge white church, Santa Maria della Salute watches over the canal. Next is the smallest sestiere, San Polo, amongst other things home to the Rialto fish market. Lastly curving around the bottom is beautiful Santa Croce.

Three islands immediately off of Venice each belong to a different sestiere. Giudecca is considered part of Dorsoduro, San Giorgio Maggiore is part of San Marco and the cemetery island of San Michele is part of Cannaregio.

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The Canals

grand Canal Venice
The Grand Canal in Venice

Venice has 3 canals, the most famous of which is the Grand Canal. The two other canals are the Cannaregio Canal which until the train line was built was the main route to Venice from the mainland, and the Giudecca Canal which is also the throroughfare for the cruise ships.

A rio in Venice

The little waterways throughout the city are not actually canals, they are called rii. (One rio, two rii). There are 150 rios or rii in Venice. As Venice needed more terra firma some of the rii were filled in and became rio tera’. Which essentially means earth filled rio. There are 53 rio tera’ in Venice. There are two types of rio tera’, the rio terra tombati which are completely filled in and the rio tera’ con volti, which still have water flowing beneath them.

Gondolas and Gondoliers

You will fall in love with the gentle swish (not even a spash) sound of the gondola in Venice. A ride on a gondola should be on your list of things to do while there, just stay away from the main tourist areas. Ask your gondolier to take you down some side canals/rios to get away from the traffic and the tourists, and get him to tell you about the things you are seeing. Most tourists seem to try and squash as many people as possible onto their gondola to try and save some money, then spend the whole time taking selfies and getting instagram fodder. Your best experience is to only have a couple of you on board, relax back into the cushions and let your gondolier tell you his story.

There are currently only 400 gondolas in Venice. At the height of the 17th and 18th centuries it is estimated there were as many as 10,000 gondolas! Custom made for the shallow lagoon, each gondola is made from 8 types of wood: lime, larch, oak, fir, cherry, walnut, elm and mahogany. Or 9 if you count the oar which is made from beech. Gondolas have been around for nearly 1000 years, with the first documentation of them dating back to 1094.

The gondola’s S shaped iron prow represents the bends in the Grand Canal, the 6 teeth represent the sestieri or districts of Venice, the curved top is the doge’s cap and the 1 ‘tooth’ sticking out the back represents the island of Giudecca. If you look closely you will notice that gondolas are lopsided. This is to balance out the gondolier’s weight.

Gondoliers have incredible posture. Watch them and you’ll see that along with their oar they are maneuvering the boat with their feet, hips and shoulders. It’s not easy to become a gondolier. The training alone takes more than 400 hours, the exam is difficult and even if you pass it there are only 3 or 4 new licenses issued per year!

My favorite gondolier move? Watch the way they slip a leg out and gently push off from any wall they come too close to. It’s almost like a ballet.

RELATED POST: 15 Thing You MUST Do In Venice

Streets and Such

That’s Santa Maria dei Miracoli peeping out at you from behind the bridge.

Venice only has 1 strada (street), the Strada Nuova in Cannaregio. Those other streets and walkways? These are called calli (one calle/two calli) and there are roughly 3000 of them. Then there are 367 rami, the small streets or ‘branches’ connecting the bigger ones. There are 10 rughe, streets lined with shops and named after the French rue, and 42 salizade, the first paved streets in Venice. These were important streets and were paved with a stone specific to Venice called masegni.

Islands, Bridges and Wells

Venice is actually a series of 118 mini islands, connected by 435 bridges. There are only 4 bridges crossing the Grand Canal. From the top down they are the Accademia Bridge, the Rialto Bridge, The Scalzi Bridge and the new guy, the Constitution Bridge, also known as the Calatrava. (Calatrava is the Spanish architect who built it.) There is only 1 bridge that has no railings, the Ponte Chiodo in Cannaregio. This bridge is also interesting because it dead ends into a house. Which by the way is now a bed and breakfast. (There is another railing free bridge on the island of Torcello, known as the devil’s bridge.)

The Ponte Chiodo in Cannaregio

Ever wonder how they got fresh water in Venice before it was eventually piped in, in 1884? If you keep an eye out you will notice that in every campo (piazza) except for Piazza San Marco, and in all the courtyards there is a well. Look a little closer and you’ll see the ground isn’t quite flat – it dips toward the well. This is because through another completely genius feat of engineering the (very) early Venetians devised a plan to capture rainwater, filter it and keep it in these wells. This blog post from Venezia Autentica explains how they did it. It’s worth checking out because did I mention – it’s brilliant!

In 1858 a census of Venice’s wells found there were 180 public wells, 6046 private wells and 556 wells that had been closed or removed. Although no longer a source of water, an estimated 600 of these beautiful and decorative wells are still scattered in the campi of Venice.

The Pilings

Photo of pilings below Venice via Venice by Venetians. Post linked here

I always think of them as poles or tree trunks, but the pilings have their own story to tell. If you look around you’ll notice there are no forests around Venice. The wood for the pilings mostly came from 3 places: Croatia, Slovenia and Montenegro. And of course they came across the Adriatic on boat and barges, centuries before boat motors were invented. Lots of them. There are more than 10 million pilings below the city of Venice. The Rialto bridge sits on 30,000 of them and the church of Santa Maria della Salute has more than 1 million pilings underneath it!

Want more information about Venice? Get a free PDF of my 10 Favorite Secret Places In Venice These are fantastic places to escape the tourist crowds and see something different in the floating city. You will also automatically get any other secret Venice information I release over the next 6 months. Get your PDF here

The Churches

Santa Maria della Salute, Venice
The church of Santa Maria della Salute in the Dorsoduro sestiere, Venice

There are 159 churches in Venice, which basically means there is one every few meters. 27 are desconsecrated, there is 1 Anglican church and 1 Greek Orthodox.

Mass Tourism and Cruise Statistics

Seriously, why are these stupid boats even allowed inside the lagoon??

Little Venice (it really is small) has the hideous ranking of being the 7th busiest cruise port in Europe and the 22nd busiest cruise port in the world. Had covid not shut down the travel industry a minimum of 56 ships would have made 518 port calls in 2020, each dumping an average of 3360 passengers. The estimated number of cruise ship passengers in 2020 that were expected to disembark in Venice (a very small, very fragile city) was 1.23 million. Despite news reports that cruise ships would no longer be allowed into the lagoon in reality the cruise ship traffic growth for Venice for 2020 was projected at 18%.

The MSC Magnifica cruise ship is seen in the Venice Lagoon on June 9, 2019, as people take to the water in the annual Vogalonga rowing regatta in Venice. – Thousands of people took to the streets in Venice on June 8, 2019, calling for a ban on large cruise ships in the city following last week’s collision between a massive vessel and a tourist boat. (Photo by Miguel MEDINA / AFP) (Photo credit should read MIGUEL MEDINA/AFP/Getty Images)

Cruise ships not only destroy the view for anyone trying to enjoy Venice and make life a nightmare for local Venetians, they also cause catastrophic damage to the environment and the city.

RELATED POST: Sustainable Travel – How To Be Part Of The Solution In 10 Simple Steps

The average depth of the Venice lagoon is 10.5 meters (34 feet) with a maximum depth of 21 meters (74 feet). The displacement of a the cruise ship pictured above is 154,000 tons according to the MSC website, and the gross tonnage is 95, 128 GT. These ships cause damage not only in wave damage but also with their wake and undertow eroding and destroying the city’s wooden piling foundations. On top of that the Venetian Port Authority had to dredge a 10 meter (33 feet) deep canal across the lagoon to accommodate the below water depth of them. This in turn allows the Adriatic to pour more water into the lagoon at high tide, causing even more flooding. Although not the sole source of the increased flooding in Venice it is a huge contributor. You can read more about it here and in this 2011 article from the Telegraph.

How is this even considered to be ok??

Venice’s Population Counter

Mass tourism is destructive on many levels but one of the worst (along with the staggering environmental damage it causes) is the effect it has on the local population. It makes living in that place almost untenable. Imagine your neighborhood suddenly getting 5 cruise ships worth of people (as many as 20,000) dumped on it each day ~ it would be a nightmare. As such between the impossibility of functioning in daily life (think doing groceries, taking kids to school, going to and from work, going to the dentist etc) and their home city being turned into a cruise ship Disneyland, local Venetians started being forced to move to the mainland.

A pharmacy on Strada Nova has a digital counter that keeps details of the locla population count. In 1973 the population of Venice was roughly 148,000. This is the count of Venetians born and bred living in their home city. As of February 6th 2021 it was down to just over 52,000.

image via Cecilia Staiano

You can read Cecilia Staiano’s article about the depopulation of Venice here. The photo above is hers taken from her Feb 6th 2021 article.

Venice’s main income source is tourism. The city needs you to come and visit, stay a few nights and enjoy her beauty, her artisans, her cuisine. Fall in love with her buildings, the magic quality of light and her gorgeous ambience. Just please don’t come on a cruise….